Pain, glorious pain!!

As stated before at my 20 week scan I asked the nurses about some pain I’d been feeling. I was diagnosed with Symphysus Pubis Disorder, otherwise known as Pelvic Girdle Pain. Description from the pelvic Partnership: (http://www.pelvicpartnership.org.uk/what-is-pgp.html)

PGP (Pelvic Girdle Pain) is a condition which affects a large number of pregnant women (up to 1 in 4 in some studies). It was commonly known as SPD (Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction), but this implies that only the symphysis pubis is affected, which is not usually the case.

There is a wide range of symptoms and the severity also varies between women. It is important to remember that PGP is a common and, in most cases, treatable condition. It can be safely treated in pregnancy.

PGP is assessed, managed and treated in the same way, whatever the cause and whenever it started. So if you have pelvic pain during or after a pregnancy, ask for treatment.

pelvic-partnership-what-is-pgp-content

SPD is increasingly known as Pelvic Girdle Pain, and because this is the term used in many recent studies, this is what we will use on this website. It describes the condition more accurately because it implies that all the pelvic joints are affected, which is the case for most women.

My experience started out as pain in my coxic bone at the end of the day. I’d sit down on the train and it would feel like my tail bone was on fire. 😦 It was then difficult to stand up, The doctors at the hospital were very good and took me upstairs and examined me thoroughly in order to rule out any other problems. At final diagnosis I was told not much to be done but rest and an appointment was made for me at the physio. Unfortunately my life took the drastic turn before I could be seen by a physio and I had to re-register with midwives in the new area and get referred again to physio.

I was finally seen by one in the summer who gave me some gentle pelvic exercise and showed me how to get in and out of bed etc. During the summer the pain was bearable as I had every second day to rest and recuperate. I really felt the full brunt of PGP when I went back to work in August.

The plan had been to work for 4 weeks then start mat leave on the 16th Sept. I went to work on Monday and smiled through the pain, caught up with colleagues I hadn’t seen all summer, that first day was fine, however by Thursday I was a very different person….

…how best to describe this pain?? well by Thursday it felt like I had been riding an old Victorian bicycle all day over cobbled streets then when I stood off the bike a huge Clydesdale horse had kicked me right between the legs. Imagine that??? Every step hurt. It was s ore to sit down, sore to stand up and in a job where I was up and down all day dealing with pupils this was very upsetting. The other, more worrying side effects of this though were the fact that I wasn’t sleeping, it was too painful. After not sleeping then needing to get up for work I was Knackered, in a way I’d never been before. I had no appetite, no energy, wasn;t eating properly and then getting stressed out because this was the beginning of my 3rd trimester I was meant to be eating more to allow my baby to put down layers of fat. Toast and beans was not a suitable dinner every night at this stage!!

I got in touch with my midwife and made an appointment to see the doctor. Unfortunatley this meant I had to leave work and driver for 2.5 hours, so after discussing options with work it was decided I’d speak to the doc about the possibilty of getting signed off. It was not the best thing I wanted to do but I had to face facts: I was not well enough to be at work and give 100%. My replacement managed to come in and start two and half weeks earlyt so I had time to do a hadn over with all the paperwork then I was off, back down home to rest up and wait for peanuts arrival.

That was two weeks ago and in that two weeks I’ve seen the physio again who was very helpful. “yes well there is no quick fix or cure, you’ve had this pain at 20 weeks, it’s likely to be worse at 34” Basically the best thing I can do is rest, but not too much. Keep mobile, bust not too much. πŸ˜‰ I’ve got a support band to wear when walking and if it gets much worse I need to go back and discuss the possibility of crutches.

How is it affecting me day to day??

Well I feel like I’m in pan all the time, mostly to be honest its a 1 or 2 out of ten then when I stand up it increases to a 9 for a minute then settles again. The other day I walked to a corner store to pick up milk, only a wee 5 minute walk but it took about 10 minutes and by by the time i got back I was in a lot of pain, an 8 or 9 for a good twenty minutes. Turning over in bed is probably the worst. It’s like a military manoeuvre. Knees together, tighten my trans-abs, move shoulder and knee together and turn. Now for a squirmer and mover when asleep like me this has caused many problems. Usually me waking up in agony. Oh and i need a pillow between my legs when asleep too.

I cant lift anything too heavy and have been instructed by physio to only do light housework so my mum has been roped into helping out round the house lots. I also can’t really do shopping anymore as pushing the trolley hurts and carrying bags hurts so for the next few weeks shopping will be a family exercise again. πŸ™‚ Its all good though – a great excuse to spend heaps of time with mum and dad and family.

I have to say though that although this pain has been a bit debilitating over the past few weeks, I can;t really complain. I’m off work, I have nothing and nowhere I need to be, except midwife appointments. I can sleep when I need, rest when I need and get up and potter to my hearts content. I know friends who have had terrible 3rd trimesters and tbh most pregnant women I speak to have some sort of discomfort or pain at this time.

I’m keeping my fingers crossed that this PGP is only pregnancy related and once we meet peanut it disappears.

Advertisements

One thought on “Pain, glorious pain!!

  1. Pingback: PHOTO OF THE DAY | News U.S. Journal

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s